Galactic Theology: An Economy of Generosity (and the Monetary System)

May we live a regime of generosity while also making sufficient income to survive and thrive in our world?

In this post, I will consider the insights of a spiritual innovator (Maria Jacobi). Jacobi claims to have contact with extra-terrestrial guides. Specifically, I will look at the concept of an economy of generosity in relation to the monetary system.

After that, I will assess Jacobi’s teachings about money and generosity in terms of the New Testament theology of the kingdom of God.

Galactic Theology: Maria Jacobi

Marina Jacobi channels galactic guides, those she names “eleventh dimensional beings” and the “Council of Nine.” Jacobi asserts that the teachings of these beings emanate from a fifth dimensional reality, which is a realm of abundance.

This realm of abundance, in New Testament terms, has a correlate in the notion of the Kingdom of God, which is a regime of justice and generosity for all.

Jacobi practices manifestation principles that are intended to supplant the monetary system with an economy of generosity.  If we put conditions upon our giving and receiving — for instance, by giving to others only if we are paid in money– then we limit the abundance that may come to us. Conversely, if we practice giving from the heart, without regard for monetary reward or other kinds of consequences, we come to see evidence that the universe does provide for us, abundantly.

Jacobi does not advise that one jump immediately, necessarily, from one regime to the other, from a money-economy to a fifth dimensional realm generosity. Nevertheless, one can make a practice of giving for its own sake. The rewards will manifest.

In my opinion, not everybody needs to walk a radical path of repudiating the monetary economy. Some of Jacobi’s stories of manifestation (see the second video below) reflect a lifestyle of material insecurity, marked by financial crises that are averted in the knick of time. If an economy of generosity is proven over time, not everybody will wish to unplug from the money system to such degree as to destabilize one’s income and one’s capacity, financially, to plan ahead. Nevertheless, her experiment in living from the heart, outside of the monetary economy, is worth considering. (See the videos below.)

New Testament: the Kingdom of God

A central teaching of the Gospels is that God’s economy of love may be trusted. We are to seek first the “kingdom of God” and everything else will follow. Yet, the reality of our lives often puts us at odds with the monetary system.

We follow our passion or our heart, we give generously from our gifts, and we may have trouble paying our bills. Or our kindness may be exploited. Conversely, some people are able to make very good money while expending only a small amount of effort. These people, who are well-placed in the monetary system, appear to reap large financial benefits — from their intentions for service.

May we live with purity of heart, giving generously, and expect that our material needs will be taken care of? Or shall we accept that we live in two worlds, simultaneously, in one of which the monetary system prevails, presenting obstacles to the economy of generosity?

A third alternative is that the “kingdom of God,” as the New Testament teaches, actually mediates these two realms in accord with the Lord’s prayer: “On earth as it is in heaven.” In this function, the kingdom of God brings an economy of generosity onto the earth so that the monetary system itself is changed. Our lives as wage earners, including our lacks, are harmonized for the flourishing of all.

Conclusion

Marina Jacobi’s radical experiment in generosity, and giving from the heart, may be one way that principles of the kingdom of God, in Christian terms, are being practiced and embodied for our times.

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Miracles/Trance: Vibrational Reality

Here are two interesting podcasts, interviews with healers and spiritual innovators.

See LINKS, which will take you to the interviews. Summaries are provided below.

Miracles (Maria Kellis): This healer tells of healing herself through a centering upon her inner vibration of gratitude and love. We have the power of choice to shift our lives and when we follow the intention of love (rather than fear, guilt, or insincere motives), miraculous results may unfold.

Trance States (Pi Villaraza): This Filipino man walked through his country in order to learn self-trust. He lived as a hermit on a mono-diet of coconuts. Along the way, he came to recognize that our normal state of consciousness, which is tethered to society and the value systems of culture, actually inhibits and hypnotizes us. By learning to surrender and to center upon the expanding states within, by ecstasy and dance, we reach trance states that reveal to us our authentic selves, where we are free.

A Horse Named Grace: (and Noah)

Here’s an inversion of the biblical Noah story. In the story of flood, Noah is saved because of his righteousness. A remnant of humanity — and animals — take refuge on the ark.

In this era of global climate change, many natural disasters put our lives at risk, both  human and animal lives. Here is a sad story of horses who died due to drought. One horse was saved. See link.

Horse Saved From Drought

Now, I do not believe that God “caused” the flood  in the days of Noah. Nor did God cause the drought that killed many horses in Arizona. However, the fact that one horse was saved — aptly named Grace — can give us hope and alert all of us, in whatever ways we can, to be like the horse Grace. We are given life. Let us live in a way that we may contribute, generously, to the lives of others. Let us do our part to avert disasters and to contribute to restoring our natural environment.

When Prophecy Fails (or Seems to)

2012 Prophecies: the Shift 

What ever happened to the golden age, which was supposed to be impending, long predicted by the Mayans and other ancient seers? On December 21, 2102, it was said, we would shift to a higher dimension or the 5th dimension. Suffering would dissolve, at least for those who cooperate with the process.

Since the world did not transform in an instant, in the aftermath of the shift predicted for 2012, many explain that no miracle had ever been predicted. A new heaven and new earth would not suddenly descend and be made real. Quite the contrary, the shift predicted would be an ongoing and gradual one.

Can’t you feel it? We are living in a new time, a quickening, aren’t we? The prophecy has come true, at least for those who have a heart to experience it.

A statement that can meaningfully be true, in logical terms, must be falsifiable, capable of being true or false. Prophecies are not always falsifiable which means that they cannot, necessarily, be verified logically.

It may be that prophetic speech is less like a prediction – which can be verified and falsified — than like a warning, which people may heed or ignore.

Biblical Prophets: No-Win 

Biblical prophets have faced a dilemma from at least the time of Jeremiah. If a prophet’s teachings are accepted because they prophesy good times and prosperity, they are likely to be false; the prophet has conjured an auspicious forecast in order to flatter the ruling establishment and to garner popularity for him or herself.

If the prophet forecasts doom, however, he or she may be regarded as a false prophet if the doom and disaster do not happen as planned. Under such conditions, it may seem that the only way a prophet can earn a reputation for accuracy is by forecasting a horrible fate that, in fact, transpires just as foreseen — (in which case, naturally, the prophet suffers because he or she will be assaulted and attacked for stating a dire predicament from which none can escape).

No wonder many prophets argue and protest when they are called to the office of  prophet!

Biblical Prophecy: Prediction or Warning?

The prophet’s fate may be rosier if he or she gives others the chance to repent and change their future.  Prophecies may be intended less as predictions than as warnings.  Does the prophet predict a future that will happen with undeviating precision? Or are prophecies aimed at moral reform, in which case the prophet serves to alert people that they ought to change their ways, lest there be unfortunate consequences?

The latter option — that prophecy aims at repentance and a change of heart — makes sense of the prophet’s role as a grim supervisor of morality.  If a painful outcome is avoided, the people may have been fairly warned and may have changed their ways in order to avert the negative outcome. Conversely, if the golden age has not yet arrived, perhaps people must change their hearts before being capable of receiving it.

So what do you think, Lightworkers? Did we undergo a shift or turn of the ages with 2012? What does that prophecy mean to you? (Send along your thoughts.)

See this classic treatment of failed prophecies:

http://Book: When Prophecy Fails 1956 Online Full Text

See this article about the prophecies of Nostradamus at the millennium. The article discusses Delores Cannon, one of the prophets of the new age.

1996 article on failed doomsday prophecies

God and UFO’s

Dear Lightworkers,

In previous posts, we’ve delved into the testimony of a researcher whose conversations with extra-terrestrials (Arcturians) have resulted in a spiritual philosophy and even a new understanding of Jesus Christ.

Today, we go beyond such individual reports to look at how the Church as an institution is accommodating our galactic friends.

Now that the New York Times has produced an investigative report on the Pentagon’s UFO program (see: NY Times on Pentagon and UFO), it is thought-provoking to consider the theological implications of extraterrestrial contact.

The Vatican’s Br. Guy Consolmagno replies to such questions on his blog, The Catholic Astronomer (see: Vatican’s Brother Guy). See also this summary article (Summary Article on ET’s and Interdisciplinary Research).

Consider, too, whether Paul’s conversion on the road to Damascus might have been caused by a falling meteor (see article: Falling Meteor on Road to Damascus).

Sayings of Jesus/Lao Tzu

Persian_depiction_of_Jesus_-_Sermon_on_the_Mount

Selections from Jesus and Lao Tzu, by Martin Aronson:  See larger selection here

Commentary is my own by Jesus Lightworker

Respond to anger with virtue Tao Te Ching 63

Matthew 5:38 Do not resist and evil doer. If anyone strikes you on the right cheek, offer him the other also. 

Commentary: The vicious circle of sin, in Christian terms  — or the deviation from the Tao, according to Lao Tzu’s philosophy — consists in a dynamic of retribution. Anger is repaid by anger, evil by evil. This cycle can occur on larger levels, as in warfare or global strife, or in smaller ways, whenever we hold a grudge or we are motivated by ill-will.  If, instead, we respond to evil with goodness and to anger with virtue, then we demonstrate that goodness and virtue are actually more powerful than their opposites.

By offering the one who strikes us the “other cheek,” we do what martial artists do when they use another’s strength against him. An evil doer comes rushing, with aggression, toward us. We simply put out our hand  — or offer the “other cheek” — at once to submit to the assault and to block it. Because we have cultivated our own inner power, and integrity of virtue, the force of the aggressor is visited back upon him by our own slightest move. Our act, without any motive of resistance or retribution, nevertheless overcomes the adversary.

Do not judge, and you will not be judged; do not condemn, and you will not be condemned. Forgive, and you will be forgiven. Luke 6:37

The sage is good to people who are good. He is also good to people who are not good. This is true goodness. The sage trusts people who are trustworthy. He also trusts people who are not trustworthy. This is true trust. Tao Te Ching 49

Commentary: If the sage trusts even people who are not trustworthy, who is he or she trusting? She or he trusts the Tao. It is the Tao that brings about the interaction or relationship itself (between the sage and the trustworthy or untrustworthy person). The Tao, the principle of Life itself,  is trustworthy. Similarly, by repaying people who are not good with goodness, the sage trusts the Tao itself, which is good.

If I lose money in a business deal, for instance, because I’ve trusted somebody untrustworthy, I have exhibited my trust in the Tao (or, in Christian terms, in the Spirit and in God), which will repay my good intentions even if I lose one particular deal, or some amount of money, along the way.   Similarly, if I forgive somebody who has stolen from me, slandered me, exploded unfairly at me, or otherwise caused me harm, I am asserting through my forgiveness that the Spirit (or God) will honor my good intentions by setting me free from these very same sins or their equivalent.

That I do not judge the wrongdoer means that I refrain from drawing inferences, globally, about his or her character. I do not enlarge the misdeed by elaborating a drama about the violation (in my own mind or verbally by rumors), nor do I nurse grievances or inflict penalties. Instead, although I may come to some harm, in this particular matter, I open myself to non-judgment and forgiveness from Spirit (or God), in the bigger horizon of my life. Spirit and God are the ground and foundation of my being. Thus, I am liberated to live life fully and abundantly, since my own generous intention is mirrored back by reality.

Why are you afraid, you of little faith ? Matthew 8:26

He who has not enough faith will not be able to command faith from others. Tao Te Ching 23

Commentary: By giving faith, we command faith from others. This principle from the Tao Te Ching suggests that people are naturally drawn toward faith, even if on the surface they may seem to be manipulated by inferior motives (such as the desire for selfish gain, approval, or material profits by dishonest tactics).

Let’s say that you have faith in a humanitarian project. You speak about the project with people who are cautious and who disbelieve that generous intentions may prevail successfully. You make a case, exhibiting faith, regarding the success of the endeavor. Citing examples of humanitarian projects that have been successful, you describe the victories of Mohammad Yunas in micro-financing, of Susan B. Anthony in the women’s suffrage movement, and of Bill Gates in starting Microsoft. All of these benevolent projects began with faith. Your associates, even if they are by nature less trusting or well-intentioned than you are, come around to your opinion, thanks to the attractive force of your faith.

Most people would like to believe that goodness and generosity will prevail, because they worry (secretly) that they may some day be in need as potential recipients of another’s good will. Jesus also counsels that we put our faith in God, the source of goodness and generosity, for anything that we might fear will dissolve at the urging of faith.

With God all things are possible. Matthew 19:26

If there is a good store of virtue, then nothing is impossible. Tao Te Ching 59

How can nothing be impossible? With God or given a good store of virtue? Can the sun drop from the sky? Is that the kind of impossible thing that will become possible with God?  No, or probably not, because for the sun to drop from the sky would be contrary to God’s laws of nature which uphold the universe for the preservation of life; since God is good and principled, the author of life, God will not allow the sun to fall from the sky for that would extinguish life.

That all things are possible with God means that all things are possible, so long as they are in accord with God’s nature, which is generous, life-giving, creative, truthful, free, and radiantly attractive and satisfying. So consider something “impossible”. Ask yourself whether this “impossible” thing would display generosity, virtue, truth and creativity, freedom or peace, joy, abundance, justice–and other qualities or benefits in accord with God’s nature. If so, then move toward this impossible thing. It will unfold, step by step. The impossible will become possible.

Confucius_Lao-tzu_and_Buddhist_Arhat_by_Ding_Yunpeng

Confucius, Lao-tzu, and a buddhist Arhat