The Law of One (the Ra Material): Channeling in the Name of Jesus Christ

Hello Lightworkers,

An essential attribute of the lightworker, quite often, is a willingness to explore and a commitment to trust one’s own direct access to spiritual intuition or knowledge. The phenomenon of channeling — which is repudiated by some Christians, as being untrustworthy or even of the devil– is embraced by others. (For more on this, see: Lightworker : Definition, Controversies and Historical Jesus – Lightworker).

Some channels claim to channel Jesus himself. Others call upon Jesus for protection, while they channel.

I came across an interesting reference to channeling in the name of Jesus Christ, during a recent interview with Jim McCarty. McCarty was one of the circle responsible for channeling the Law of One, also known as the Ra Material.  Kevin Moore, of the Moore Show, is putting on a documentary about channeling. His interview with McCarty is thought provoking.  (See: Moore Show).

Alongside Jim McCarty, another in the channeling circle, responsible for the Ra Material,  was Carla L. Rueckert, who had been married to Jim until she passed away a couple of years ago.

According to Jim McCarty, in this interview, Carla held that it is quite easy to channel, since many spiritual entities are willing to make contact and to establish communication with a person who is open and receptive. However, not all entities or spirits are trustworthy. In order to test the spirits, Carla used to ask three times, “Do you come in the name of Jesus Christ?”. If a spirit could pass muster by this test, she would make herself receptive to the spiritual message.

For Carla, as reported by her husband Jim, the name of Jesus Christ signified her highest spiritual commitment and ideals; he speaks about this topic, in the interview with Kevin Moore, from minute 19:30 to 22:15–see link below.  Jesus Christ embodies a spiritual ideal and example, for which the disciple is willing to live or to die. Thus, as a channel and Christian disciple, Carla maintained her faith in Jesus Christ and even solicited the approval, as to channelled contents, from clergy of the Episcopal Church to which she belonged.

Interestingly, the test to which Carla put the spirits, by asking whether they come in the name of Jesus Christ, is reminiscent of the prayer and spiritual practices of the Desert Fathers and Mothers in late antiquity.  In their asceticism and solitary prayer, they would confront various spirits and test them in the name of Jesus Christ.  It was the name of Jesus Christ which could banish even the devil.

See, for instance, the Life of St. Antony the Great by Athanasius, ch. 40: “Once a demon exceeding high appeared with pomp, and dared to say, “I am the power of God and I am Providence, what dost thou wish that I shall give thee?” But I then so much the more breathed upon him, and spoke the name of Christ, and set about to smite him. And I seemed to have smitten him, and forthwith he, big as he was, together with all his demons, disappeared at the name of Christ.” (You may find the Life of St Antony the Great in PDF: Life of St Antony).

Channeling, for some channels, is not so different from ancient mystical prayer.

Here is a copy of Book One of the Ra Material: The Law of One : Book One.

Cannibalism – Jesus movement

Gospel of John #37  : Text of passage (6:60-71) is reproduced below

After Jesus claims in John 6 that his own body (flesh) and his blood must be ingested, in order for people to gain eternal life, many are aghast at this claim.  John’s Gospel likely reflects the charges, against early Christians, of human sacrifice, combined with cannibalism.

(Reproduced below is an excerpt from an article about this stereotyped accusation, which was directed against Christians in the early period. The counter-accusation, in turn, alleged the same vulgarity of pagans in their religious rituals. You will find, too, a link to the entire article by J. Rives, a Roman historian. See also the link to a contemporary article about religious rituals and cannibalism).

The Gospel counters this charge by the suggestion that the life of God is Spirit not flesh (v.63). Thus, cannibalism does not pertain to God. Because Jesus embodies God, he will not die but instead ascend (v. 62). Furthermore, those who believe that Jesus is the Son of God, based on his works (e.g. miracles) and teachings, will ascertain the truth of his words, which are filled with spirit and life (v.63).

Only a few can understand this strange claim about Jesus’s stature and mission, which (to outsiders) entails cannibalism. Those who do understand that Jesus’s life is divine, and his mission bestowed directly by God, continue to follow him. For, as Peter recognizes, “You have the words of eternal life” (v.68b).

The idea that a man’s own body must be eaten — as flesh and blood — does sound bizarre and repulsive. It is only if we accept the theological claim of the Gospel of John that the idea may become palatable. For by “eating”  the bread of heaven, and drinking the blood of God, we do not eat human flesh like cannibals. Instead, we partake directly in God’s Spirit, which offers freedom, eternal life, and Love.

Question: If you were among the original audience for this speech, what would your reaction have been? 

Early Christians accused of human sacrifice and cannibalism


(excerpt, introduction for complete article see: Human Sacrifice Pagans and Early Christians through JSTOR — copy may be downloaded for free through public library databases) 

In Minucius Felix’ dialogue on the value of Christianity, written in the late second or early third century C.E.,1 the character Caecilius, who presents the anti-Christian arguments, recounts a story about their initiations, ‘a story as loathsome as it is well known’: after the initiate has struck a baby concealed under a covering of flour, those present drink the blood from its wounds and so seal their union (Oct. 9.5). Later in the dialogue, Octavius, the defender of Christianity, refutes this slander. The alleged crime, he argues, is so terrible that ‘no one could believe it except the sort of person who would attempt it’. He goes on to point out that pagans, not Christians, are the ones who practise actual human sacrifice. He supports his claim by citing specific examples: the Africans who used to sacrifice their children to Saturn, the Taurians and the Egyptian Busiris who sacrificed foreigners, the Gauls, and lastly the Romans themselves, who in the past would bury alive two Greeks and two Gauls and who in his own day sacrifice men to Jupiter Latiaris (Oct. 30. I) .

Although Caecilius describes the story he tells about the Christians as a notafabula, it is somewhat difficult to determine exactly how widely known it was. Virtually every Christian apologist between i so and 200 C.E. refers to the charge, but the evidence from the pagan side is much less extensive.2 After investigating the activities of Christians in Bithynia, the younger Pliny notes in his report to Trajan that they gather together ‘to take food, food that is ordinary enough and harmless’ (Ep. X.96.7). The appended qualification suggests that in the i iOS Pliny had already heard some version of these stories, and took them seriously enough to make inquiries.3 Some years later, Fronto had heard enough about the charges to elaborate on them in a speech.4 Later still, the citizens of Lugdunum who instituted a persecution of local Christians in I77 C.E. were apparently convinced of their truth, since they tried thro torture to make one woman confess to such deeds (Eus., HE v. I.26). although the evidence is scanty, there is enough to suggest that at least some pagans both knew and believed these stories.

See Link: Cargo Cults Accused of Cannibalism

John 6: 60- 71

60 When many of his disciples heard it, they said, “This teaching is difficult; who can accept it?” 61 But Jesus, being aware that his disciples were complaining about it, said to them, “Does this offend you? 62 Then what if you were to see the Son of Man ascending to where he was before? 63 It is the spirit that gives life; the flesh is useless. The words that I have spoken to you are spirit and life. 64 But among you there are some who do not believe.” For Jesus knew from the first who were the ones that did not believe, and who was the one that would betray him. 65 And he said, “For this reason I have told you that no one can come to me unless it is granted by the Father.”

66 Because of this many of his disciples turned back and no longer went about with him. 67 So Jesus asked the twelve, “Do you also wish to go away?” 68 Simon Peter answered him, “Lord, to whom can we go? You have the words of eternal life. 69 We have come to believe and know that you are the Holy One of God.” 70 Jesus answered them, “Did I not choose you, the twelve? Yet one of you is a devil.” 71 He was speaking of Judas son of Simon Iscariot, for he, though one of the twelve, was going to betray him.


We, the Arcturians (#2) and Jesus Christ: The Second Coming

We, the Arcturians, by Norma J. Milanovich, transmits the message that the Arcturians, a star-people, are returning to earth to assist its inhabitants to move into a higher consciousness. These celestial beings, as Milanovich depicts them, are dedicated to Jesus Christ, as the most Radiant One, and to other ascended Masters.

Their service to Jehovah is told by their farewell salutation, “Adonai,” (which sounds to me like an improvisation upon “Adieu”). As Milanovich’s Arcturian glossary explains: “ADONAI- Hebrew word for The Lord. The pronouncement of the Holy Name Jehovah (or the name of the God of Israel) is attributed the power of working miracles. The revealed absolute Deity, the Holy Creator, the Redeemer. Used by the Arcturians in farewell as a seal to the transmissions.”

If the Arcturians transmit a message of love and light, as Milanovich claims, what  does this love look like? And what resemblance does this Love have to the love preached by Jesus of Nazareth?

The Arcturians, as channeled through Milanovich, sketch a cosmology and history of civilization, which culminates in an apocalyptic confrontation, capped by the Second Coming of Jesus Christ. According to the Arcturian myth of origins, the Arcturians lived on earth in primitive times. A warlike people later invaded, disturbing the peace and well-being of the Arcturian civilization. Now, the earth has been taken over, in equal parts, by love and truth (on the one side) and by hatred and lies (on the other side), by forces of light and by forces of darkness. We are at a critical turning point, and in some ways, a disastrous one. The Arcturians are returning as our saviors and helpers.

Once points of light are anchored onto the earth, and although there will be some strife as those in league with powers of darkness resist the encroaching regime of the children of light, nevertheless a Second Coming is on its way. The “most Radiant Soul, Sananda Jesus the Christ” will return.  He will “open a path to the Father’s house.” One of Milanovich’s Arcturian informers identifies himself as the Beloved Disciple in John’s Gospel, one of Jesus’s closest companions.

The result of the Second Coming will be that the earth will experience a rebirth into a higher consciousness, while the children of Light will establish their policies on earth of equality, mutual respect, peace, ecological responsibility, and justice. This picture, if a utopia, sounds appealing.

Yet, I will raise two critical questions about the Christian vision that is expressed through this Arcturian scenario. As my earlier post indicated, for any channelled material, we may test the spirits: are the spirits responsible for this vision holy or somehow inferior and misleading?

To begin with the last-mentioned point, regarding testing the spirits, 1 John 4 suggests this criterion: I John 4:1-2 “Beloved, do not believe every spirit, but test the spirits to see whether they are from God; for many false prophets have gone out into the world.  By this you know the Spirit of God: every spirit that confesses that Jesus Christ has come in the flesh is from God.” The passage goes onto say: vv.7-8: “Beloved, let us love one another, because love is from God; everyone who loves is born of God and knows God.  Whoever does not love does not know God, for God is love.”

What does it mean to confess that Jesus has come in the flesh? As the criterion for testing the spirits? One way to interpret this test is to maintain that Jesus’s coming in the flesh meant that he was capable of transforming the flesh — the material conditions of our lives. He did not merely preach a spirituality for the elite; rather, he performed works of healing and feeding for people of every spiritual grade and social category.

Jesus performed good works (healing, feeding, stilling storms). He even raised the dead. If the Arcturians serve this Jesus Christ, who came in the flesh, then it follows that we might expect to witness tangible miracles, and self-evidently loving good deeds, inspired by their message to the children of light.

Where are these miracles? Are children being fed? the sick in hospitals being healed? Tangibly and in the flesh? Are educational programs and libraries being offered to girls who lack education, across the world, through the dawning fifth dimensional vibration, heralded by the Arcturians? (For a similar critique, see: Critique of New Age Spirituality; see also the articles specifically about the Arcturians in this blog).

My second point of critique concerns the regime of love that is announced by Milanovich’s Arcturian guides. I refer the reader to an article, which raises ethical questions about the vision presented here. The author points out that various patterns of domination control, including implicit acquiescence to alien abductions, are evident in the Arcturian teachings. (See the critique here : Critique: We the Arcturians and here: Critique Milanovich Arcturians).

In brief, it may be questioned, how loving this teaching is, in fact; further, the Jesus, Sananda, the Radiant One may have only a verbal resemblance to Jesus of Nazareth, who came in the flesh and who is capable of raising the dead.

For more on alien abductions, see: NY Times on Alien Abductions; and as sleep paralysis: Sleep Paralysis Alien Abductions


Vision of Female Christ (Early Christian Female Visionaries and Prophets)

Dear Lightworkers,

Our devotional lives depend on the imagination. A rich imagination prospers our emotional and spiritual foundations. We connect personally to a God/Spirit who comes to us in forms that arouse our yearnings or our curiosity. Why then is the contemporary imagination, pertaining to Jesus Christ, sometimes rather fixated on the maleness of Jesus? It was otherwise for early Christians.

Here is a report — from the second or third century — about a vision of the female Christ, which came to a female prophet. We learn of this vision from a church writer and heresiologist Epiphanius.

To be clear, the vision of a female Christ that Epiphanius reports may not be a literal and accurate report. This church writer may have been defaming and slandering the group, against whom he argues, by imputing to their female leaders a vision of the female Christ. Nevertheless, the passage is intriguing and may speak to the actual devotional practices of early Christians.

Epiphanius of Salamis, Cyprus (c.311-403)  put together a book called Panarion (literally: Medicine Chest), in which he makes a collection of heresies (figuratively: diseases) and orthodox truths (figuratively: medicines).  He writes about the Montanists, a group which adhered to the teaching of the prophet Montanist, and Maximilla and Prisicilla, two female prophets. They lived in the mid-second century in the area of Phrygia (in modern day Turkey).

Their movement, at its inception, was called the New Prophecy, and went through a number of iterations during the several centuries of its lifespan.  Besides accepting females as leaders and prophetesses in their movement, the group were millenarian, who supposed that heaven would come to earth in the Phrygian city Pepuza. [See below for a link to more writings about the Montanist movement].

In one report Epiphanius argues against a certain off-shoot of this movement, called the Quintillianists. Their prophetess had a vision of Christ as a woman. Although Epiphanius does not favor this group – he conceives them to be heretics – we, as modern people, are free to examine the matter from their side. In any case, we have evidence, here, of the visionary richness of the early Christian movement.

Here’s the report from Epiphanius, Panarion 49.1:

  1. … The Quintillianists or Priscillianists say that either Quintilla or Priscilla (I am not sure which one, but one of them), as I mentioned before, slept in Pepuza and Christ came to her and he slept next to her and it happened this way according to the misled woman: “Christ came to me dressed in a white robe,” she said, “in the shape of a woman, instilled into me wisdom, and shared with me how that this place is holy, and that Jerusalem will come down from heaven here.” And, because of this, even down to this day, they say, that certain women and men also are initiated there on the site, so that those people can wait for Christ and see him [themselves]. They are women in this group whom they refer to as prophetesses.

**Tertullian (155 – 240 CE), the North African Christian theologian, was an adherent to the New Prophecy. Later writers, of which there are a great number, argued voluminously against the Montanists. For a comprehensive set of documents, see Montanist Archives

***For female Christ images see: Art that Dares




NFL Protests and early Christian Martyrs

Hello All,

Peaceful protest, and the right to dissent, are encoded in our democratic constitution. The NFL controversies (see: NYTimes on NFL ) are sparking new debates about this freedom. Where does peaceful protest, such as the NFL players demonstrate by kneeling rather than standing during patriotic anthems, constitute a healthy freedom? Where do such gestures undermine civic unity and become disloyal or unpatriotic?

From a Christian standpoint, similar democratic rights are enshrined in early Christian accounts. The Roman governor Pliny the Younger (in 112 CE) wrote to the Roman emperor Trajan about disciplinary problems, in his territories, concerning  Christians (see: Pliny’s Letter on Christians ) who confess to being Christian. Pliny wants to know whether the mere name of Christian is sufficient to be deemed a crime or whether it is only crimes (in conjunction with this self-appellation) that may give cause for legal suspicions. The Christians are innocent in their practices (see Pliny’s description of their practices below). What then gave the Romans reason to criminalize Christianity? Such that to belong to this sect (this “superstition”) would constitute a crime?

As the martyrdom accounts show, it was the Christian refusal to offer obeisance and sacrifices to the emperor that incurred civil rebuke. Christians made peaceful protests against what they viewed as monarchic abuses in the Roman imperial regime. They offered worship to God alone not to a human ruler.

The Martyrdom of Perpetua and Felicitas, a second century text, exhibits in stock scene the trial of early Christian martyrs who refused to offer obeisance or sacrifices to the emperor. (See excerpt below).

As a country, the USA was founded upon democratic protests against monarchic abuses. Surely, the people ought to exercise these freedoms, while our president could squarely confront rather than punishing such critique. Christianity was founded upon a similar right to critique authoritarian regimes while offering devotion to God alone.

From the Martyrdom of Perpetua and Felictas : Hilarianus the governor, who had received his judicial powers as the successor of the late proconsul Minucius Timinianus, said to me: ‘Have pity on your father’s grey head; have pity on your infant son. Offer the sacrifice for the welfare of the emperors.’ ‘I will not’, I retorted. ‘Are you a Christian?’ said Hilarianus. And I said: ‘Yes, I am.’ When my father persisted in trying to dissuade me, Hilarianus ordered him to be thrown to the ground and beaten with a rod. I felt sorry for father, just as if I myself had been beaten. I felt sorry for his pathetic old age. Then Hilarianus passed sentence on all of us: we were condemned to the beasts, and we returned to prison in high spirits.

From Pliny’s Letter: re Early Christian practices.

That they were wont, on a stated day, to meet together before it was light, and to sing a hymn to Christ, as to a god, alternately; and to oblige themselves by a sacrament [or oath], not to do anything that was ill: but that they would commit no theft, or pilfering, or adultery; that they would not break their promises, or deny what was deposited with them, when it was required back again; after which it was their custom to depart, and to meet again at a common but innocent meal, which they had left off upon that edict which I published at your command, and wherein I had forbidden any such conventicles. These examinations made me think it necessary to inquire by torments what the truth was; which I did of two servant maids, who were called Deaconesses: but still I discovered no more than that they were addicted to a bad and to an extravagant superstition.